One benefit of living in rural America is that when my kids have sporting events, we don’t just jump in the car for a 20 minute drive down the road. Nope, that would be too easy. We book a hotel, load up the truck and head four or five hours down the freeway. My daughter ran in the regional track meet this past weekend (with the idea of regional being relative), so we spent about eight hours in the car to watch her run in two races, a grand total of four and a half minutes.

Why is this a benefit of living in rural America you might be asking? Its a benefit because I actually get to sit and do things like: talk to my husband, read a book, or as the case this past weekend, pick up a quilt project from last summer and do some handwork.

The tips of my fingers hurt and are filled with little holes since I forgot a thimble, but I actually finished the center applique panel of a quilt. A miracle might happen this week, and I just might finish the whole thing.

When I first started, I wanted to create an applique with a folk art feel.  I couldn’t decide on the traditional solid black background or the dotted one, but I ultimately decided on the polka dot. It’s much more fun.

           

I meant to take pics of the progress, but that was really difficult to do in the truck, and I’ll be honest, I forgot to. I’ve done lots of applique, but I think this is one of my favorites. The pattern is a modification of one that I found in Elly Sienkiewicz’s book Applique 12 Easy Ways. It’s great resource for any type of applique you might be interested in.

Here’s the final block.  I used scrap fabric for the flowers and hearts and I like how it adds to the folk art feel of it.  I also decided not to use the bright orange I had originally picked out for the flowers. Instead I used a dark read on the big flower and didn’t use any solid on the smaller flowers. It was getting too busy.

It’s been a fun project, even though its taken months to finish.  Now I just need to figure out what I’m going to work on this weekend, since its back across the state for another race.